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The price of interesting discoveries (How to find Never Never Land)

“I know a place where dreams are born and time is never planned. It’s not on any chart. You must find it with your heart.” -Never Never Land

There are two ways to make discoveries.

One is practical. The other is playful.

The practical mode is when we look for things in the places where we expect to find them.

The playful mode is when we explore those spaces that offer nothing to our agendas other than an opportunity to see what happens.

When the practical-minded seeker looks for something, the emphasis is on the object being sought.

When the playful-minded seeker looks for something, the emphasis is on the act of looking itself.

Life necessitates that we all play the role of practical-minded seeker.

It’s the playing around stuff that gives us trouble.

Everybody understands, accepts, and encourages the person who feels compelled to “get it done.”

But if one is not careful of the company he keeps when he dares to play, he might find himself in a great deal of trouble.

Here’s today’s two cents:

Wasting time is bad for business, but refusing to play is an even deadlier game.

When we ONLY allow ourselves to do those things that have a measurable payoff, we experience the universe as a place that gives us no permission to venture out beyond precedence.

We become automatons in a mechanical world rather than cultivators of an organic universe.

Sacrificing our insistence that all activities come with pragmatic justification is the price we must pay to make interesting discoveries and lead interesting lives.

I’ll end where I began…

lyrics from the song Never Never Land by Kurt Elling:

“My friends, everyday we live our everyday lives. We go to our everyday work, return to our everyday homes, and drink from the everyday cup, but we never allow ourselves to enter into the extraordinary places in our minds, in our hearts. I ask you, my friends; How do you think a book is written? How do you think a song is born? How do you think a race is won? How do you think the world gets started? If a little daydreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream LESS, but to dream MORE…to DREAM ALL THE TIME!!”

Cheers,

T.K. Coleman

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  1. This is quite a wonderful post. It made me remember that I live a practical life, but I need more time to play.

    I find it interesting that you bring up the matter of the company we keep though. Are the people we have as friends and companions not the same people that would journey with us in a playful manner? Yes, certain friends may be more trouble than others, but we did choose them to be a part of our personal crowd. Therefore, we know what type of crowd we allow ourselves to be seen with.

    If the practical-minded person seeks only an object that is needed then who would be your companion if not a person of a playful-mindset?

    If the playful-minded person seeks only the act of looking itself then who would be your companion if not a person of a practical-mindset?

    They balance themselves out. A person whom is practical will have a playful friend that helps them relax once and a while. Whereas, a person whom is playful will have a practical friend that helps them recollect themselves.

    Each friend that we choose, we usually know enough about them in order to decide which category they might fit in our lifestyles. We choose whom is in our lives, whether in a good or bad manner.

    “When we ONLY allow ourselves to do those things that have a measurable payoff, we experience the universe as a place that gives us no permission to venture beyond our precedence.” I find this to be an interesting statement, especailly after the statement of the company we keep. If you precieve the universe as only a place of no permission, then you will most likely have a friend that will precieve the universe as a playground. Having this friend shows you that you do have a sense of a playful-mind, but you constantly choose to use your practical senses.”

    “Sacrificing our insistence that all activities come with pragmatic justification is the price we must pay to make interesting discoveries and lead interesting lives.” Also an interesting statement to me. I would like a little more detail, I don’t think I understand it.

    I would love to hear your thoughts.

    Regards

    Emmy

  2. And to quote Einstein: “Do everything in your power to stay in the presence of extraordinary people.” Whether practical or playful, or both, they are all around us, and in us.

    The fun, the mystery, the excitement and the challenge lay in these discoveries.

    Regards,

    Alana

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