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Even when it hurts, it helps

If the object of a man’s desire is good when he first conceives it, it doesn’t automatically become bad at the moment when he discovers he can’t have it.

Pretending that we don’t really care about our unrealized desires is an ineffective and unhealthy strategy for coping with failure and disappointment.

We must own our failures and disappointments with self-honesty, dignity, and an uncompromising dedication to following the truth wherever it leads.

This process of being committed to reality is not a fatalistic concession.

It’s precisely the opposite.

It’s the recognition that truth, even when it hurts, is a transformative agent that will generously lend its power to anyone who’s willing to fully embrace it.

This Post Has 2 Comments
  1. Another thoughtful post.

    We must not learn to “fail with dignity.” Instead we can perform a healthy post
    mortem on our failures and disappointments and turn them into springboards
    for fulfilling our dreams. Then truth will stop hurting and start healing.

    Failures and disappointments are events, not a person. And they should be
    cremated, not embalmed.

    “It’s the recognition that truth, even when it hurts, is a transformative agent that will generously lend its power to anyone who’s willing to fully embrace it.”

    You do have a way with words, Mr. T.K.

    Regards.

    1. Thank you, Alana 🙂

      I love this: Failures and disappointments are events, not a person. And they should be
      cremated, not embalmed.

      Regarding this: We must not learn to “fail with dignity.”

      I agree. In whatever we do, we must remain connected to our sense of dignity, but I agree that failure isn’t something we need to dignify. We can use it as feedback and then move on to better things.

      Cheers to “failing forward” (to borrow from John Maxwell’s book title)

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