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No one has ever died from sounding “too obvious”

“Change is most often invoked not by our need to impress commentators and critics with dazzling displays of originality, but by our genuine desire to give voice to those concepts and convictions whose suppression would make our own souls miserable.” –State the Obvious

Few things are more likely to create sadness and suffering than our tendency to assume the following:

1) If something is truly important, then someone (other than myself) will probably notice it and do something about it.

2) If something is obvious to me, then someone (other than myself) has probably already said it, addressed it, thought of it, or created it.

I am reminded of this quotation from Martin Niemöller:

“First they came for the communists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a communist;
Then they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a socialist;
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a trade unionist;
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a Jew;
Then they came for me—
and there was no one left to speak out for me.”

There are things to be afraid of in this world, but sounding obvious isn’t one of them.

The obviousness of our observations are a threat to no one. It’s our acts of suppression and self-censorship that are capable of causing the real harm.

Many evils and ills have been perpetuated as a direct result of people being too afraid to say what was on their minds, but no one has ever died from sounding too obvious.

If it inspires you, if it moves you, or even if it disturbs you, state the obvious.

 

This Post Has 6 Comments
    1. Thank you, Alana. I’m reminded of lessons you extracted from your family experiences regarding the dangers of suffering in silence because of the assumptions we make about what others already should know.

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