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Hiring for the Right Mindset, Being Non-Local, & Ideas as Multipliers (Reading Notes 6.18.18)

Resource: Secure and respected and engaged and risky
Link: https://seths.blog/2018/03/secure-and-respected/

Thoughts/Reflections:

Different people want different things from their job. Some seek security and stability. Others seek high engagement, risk, and creative freedom. Of course, there are more workspace conditions than these but the point is that we all have unique concepts of the ideal workplace. When recruiting team members, make sure you 1) understand the mindset of the person you’re considering 2) speak the language of their mindset and 3) hire the right mindset, not just the right talent.

Quotes/Excerpts:

“When you sit with an employee who seeks security and talk to them about “failing fast,” and “understanding the guardrails,” and “speaking up,” it’s not likely to resonate. It’s worth finding the right state of mind for the job that needs to be done.”

Resource: You don’t have to be local
Link: https://sivers.org/local

Thoughts/Reflections:

There are two kinds of mindsets when it comes to your sense of community and your relationship to where you live: the local mindset and the global mindset.

The local mindset is when you find meaning and fulfillment by immersing yourself in the community. You support local happenings, you get to know the people, and you feel a sense of belonging to the place and the place belonging to you.

The global mindset is when you find meaning and fulfillment by creating things for the broader world, forging connections around the globe, and supporting things based on their alliance with your mission rather than their proximity to your geographical location.

Derek Sivers has lived in many different places throughout his life (NY, Singapore, Portland, etc) and it’s helped him realize that he’s a global guy. What he enjoys the most is writing, starting creative projects, and doing other things that will connect him to and benefit the world at large. Sivers argues that neither the local mindset or the global mindset is superior. It’s not a matter of right and wrong. It’s a matter of identifying what works best for you.

I related to Sivers and the global mindset the most. I have places that I love more than others (ie. I find Chicago much more enjoyable than Detroit & I’d rather live in Southern California than New York), but I typically don’t find meaning in the process of plugging into my geographical community. I prefer for my community to organically evolve around my interests however I express them.

Quotes/Excerpts:

“You can focus your time locally or globally. But if you over-commit yourself locally, you under-commit yourself globally, and vice-versa. If you’re local, then you’re probably social, doing a lot of things in-person, and being a part of your community. But this means you’ll have less time to focus on creating things for the world. If you’re global, then you want to focus on creating things that can reach out through distribution to the whole world. But this means you’ll have less time to be part of your local community. Neither is right or wrong, but you need to be aware of the choices you’re making.”

“Both are necessary. Neither is right or wrong. But you need to be aware that you can choose the local/global balance that feels best to you, no matter the norms.”

Resource: Ideas are just a multiplier of execution
Link: https://sivers.org/multiply

Thoughts/Reflections:

The quality of ideas matter, but not as much as people thing. An absolutely awful idea can’t become valuable through hard work and an absolutely brilliant idea can go further than an ordinary idea with less work, but for the most part the leverage is in the execution. Sivers provides a very interesting calculation chart to illustrate this concept of “ideas as multipliers.” He then shows how weak execution can undermine and great idea and how great execution can stretch the value of a mediocre idea.

 

The lesson here isn’t about valuing ideas less. I think Sivers would agree with those who affirm the value of seeking out new ideas. The lesson is to not be misled by the notion that our creative ideas have some sort of intrinsic value. As an entrepreneur or creative, you should be less worried about people stealing your ideas and more worried that you’re not spending enough time executing.

Quotes/Excerpts:

“It’s so funny when I hear people being so protective of ideas. People who want me to sign an NDA to tell me the simplest idea. To me, ideas are worth nothing unless executed. They are just a multiplier. Execution is worth millions.”

“The most brilliant idea, with no execution, is worth $20. The most brilliant idea takes great execution to be worth $20,000,000. That’s why I don’t want to hear people’s ideas. I’m not interested until I see their execution.”

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