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I go dancing with my thoughts

Have you ever danced with a thought? Have you ever made love to an idea?

Do those questions sound crazy to you?

Well, what about these questions;

Have you ever disagreed with a thought? Have you ever analyzed an idea?

Why does the first set of questions sound so absurd while the other questions seem perfectly normal?

If you’re open, I would like to invite you to play around for a moment with a different way of thinking about thinking.

None of what follows is the absolute truth. It’s just a thought experiment. But some interesting discoveries can be made while conducting thought-experiments, so let’s see where this one takes us.

Light, sound, and perception

Basic Physics tells us that an electromagnetic wave is experienced as light when it is perceived with the eye.

That same electromagnetic wave is experienced as sound when perceived with the ear.

One wave.
 
The same vibratory activity.
 
Two different ways of experiencing it.

Whether or not you SEE LIGHT or HEAR SOUND all depends on the organ you use to apprehend electromagnetic wave activity.

The reality behind these two varying experiences is the same, but it’s the way we process it that determines if we perceive it as light, sound, or something altogether different.

Here’s my question for you:

If there’s more than one way to experience electromagnetic energy, is it also possible that there is more than one way to experience other familiar forms of energy? 

Is there more than one way to experience a thought?

In a way that is analogous to electromagnetic energy, what we call “thoughts” can be viewed as a form of mental energy. From one point of view, thoughts can be described as ”the vibratory activity of consciousness.” Let’s call them “thought-waves” for now. 

When we attempt to apprehend “thought-waves” with the mind, we experience them as ideas.

What we call an “idea” can be viewed as merely one way of experiencing “thought-waves.”

Now, what if “thought-waves” are more than just ideas? What if they also have an inner core or energetic essence that can be directly felt with the heart?

The mind can certainly lead to many interesting discoveries, but what if the heart can take us straight to the inner essence of an “idea”?

In other words, what if the energy behind an idea was expressing something that could be grasped differently or more fully with the heart?

The Energy behind the activity of thought

For ages, mystics and poets have affirmed that Consciousness or Infinite Intelligence is the Source and Substance of all that is.

They claimed to experience the activity of this Consciousness as a Living Energy and a Felt Presence.

This Energy, we’re told, isn’t just mathematical. It’s also musical. It vibrates. It moves. It’s also personal. It feels. It breathes. 

This Energy, they say, does not wish to be contemplated with the mind alone. It wishes to be engaged with the heart. It longs to connect with us at a level of experience that transcends the boundaries of thought. 

Bringing Ideas to life

We’ve been taught that ideas are lifeless.  But are they?

We’ve been trained to see concepts as cold and abstract. But are they?

We’ve been conditioned to think of thoughts as impersonal. But are they?

What if the millions of thoughts that pass us by on any given day are not JUST thoughts?

What if so-called “ideas”are simply our head’s one dimensional interpretation of a higher multidimensional reality?

What if we just haven’t been taught how to perceive this energy we experience as thoughts in a way that goes beyond the mind?

Thinking with the heart-brain

Eastern Orthodox monks often spoke of something called “The Prayer of the Heart” where a state is attained in which “the mind descends into the heart.”

The “Prayer of the Heart” is a form of meditation that is said to lead to a mode of knowing that transcends logic. Through this state one is able to directly encounter the “Uncreated Energy of God” which lies behind all phenomena, mental and physical.

What would happen if we all dared to “wax monastic” a bit by thinking with our heart-brain rather than JUST using our head-brain?

What kinds of experiences are we capable of opening ourselves up to when we playfully explore life in this manner?

What we regard as mystical or supernatural just might become more of the norm.

We just might find ourselves doing seemingly magical things like dancing with our thoughts and making love to our ideas.

If such a concept sounds unthinkable, then perhaps that’s a clue that there’s room for us to open up to broader ways of thinking.

But that’s just a feeling I have.

Feel me?

T.K. Coleman

86% of your week is problem free

 
Conflict is an idea that exist primarily in the mind. As I minimize conflict in my thoughts, I reduce conflict in my experience.

90% mind, 10% matter

Have you ever heard the idea that your world is 90% mind, 10% matter?

It’s been well said that “life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it”. Let’s really think about this for a moment, because this would be a very important concept if it’s actually true.

Even if we can’t do anything about 10% of our lives, 90% is still an awfully high percentage to maintain control over. Most people I know would be thrilled if they could just improve their lives by a mere 50%.

What’s the bottom line?

Let’s conduct a thought experiment.

Close your eyes and imagine an unpleasant experience from your past. It can be an argument with a friend, an embarrassing moment at work, whatever makes you feel unpleasant. Take your time and relive that experience thoroughly. Done?

Now ask yourself “how long was that event in real-time?” How much time did you actually spend arguing with your friend or embarrassing yourself at work? Please keep in mind the fact that I am not asking you to measure how long the problem affected you? I only want you to calculate how long the physical event of being in the presence of the problem actually lasted.

Do the math

While most of our unpleasant experiences may be relatively short-lived, let’s just assume that your experience lasted for a full, non-stop, uninterrupted period of 24hrs.

Now take 24hrs and divide that by the number of hours you’ve lived in the past week (168hrs per week).

24hrs/168hrs= 0.14

So that problem, measured as a physical event, constitutes about 14% of your life in the past week alone.

Is this not astonishing?

How can an unpleasant event that only comprises a meager 14% of our entire week, dominate our whole lives?

In Tomorrow’s post, I’ll give my two cents on why we allow “the 14%”, or what Richard Carlson called “the small stuff”, to push us around and block us from the life of happiness that is rightfully ours.

I hope you’ll join me. In the meantime, keep your head up.

Cheers 🙂

T.K. Coleman

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