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Why I value being creative more than being positive

For many people, “being positive” amounts to trying really hard to be a good sport who laughs a lot and gets along with everyone.

But this image of optimism fails to account for all of the healthy, successful people who don’t seem to be friendly, upbeat, or outwardly cheerful at all.

While I freely embrace conventional terms like “positivity”, “optimism”, and “happiness”, in actual practice I tend to be very broad and flexible with how I apply so-called “principles of positive thinking” to my daily life.

I don’t believe success, happiness, and health are the result of “positive thinking” as much as they are the result of “empowered thinking.” For me, optimism isn’t about fitting any one person’s definition of what it means to be positive. Optimism is about finding whatever approach works for you in the quest to create the kind of life you truly love.

It’s far more important that you develop your own process for creating desired results (whether you desire happiness, wealth, or anything else), than striving to outdo the guy who walks around with a smile on his face 7 days a week.

If having a serious face helps you to focus more, then the smiles can wait for a later time.

If you’ve found a way to successfully channel the feeling of anger along creative lines, may the force be with you.

Forget about the positivity stereotypes. Trying to conform to them is a big pain in the tush.

After all, the value of your life isn’t determined by how positive others think you are, but by what works and feels right for you.

That’s my two cents. What do you think?

T.K. Coleman

If you liked this post, check out:

1. Perkiness & positivity are two different things

2. What to do when being positive feels fake?

3. Must An Optimist Always Be Positive?

If you enjoy my posts, be sure to also check out my weekly celebrity inspiration blog, Gossip Gone Good.

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