Don’t go to College: Isaac Morehouse on education, entrepreneurship, and what it takes to succeed in the real world

According to Isaac Morehouse, if we taught children how to ride bicycles in the same way we teach them in school, we’d have a world of people who knew lots of facts about bikes but lacked the ability to actually ride them.

Join FiFi & T.K. as they converse with Isaac about why a traditional college education wont cut it in the real world, why many college graduates feel lied to and ripped off, how education differs from schooling, and how Praxis can help students develop the practical skills that will help them survive and thrive in the emerging creative economy.

You can listen to the podcast in three ways:

1) Listen right here on the blog by clicking the play button below

2) Listen via our channel on Podomatic by clicking here.

3) Listen via the YouTube clip embedded below.

I hope you enjoy the latest episode of Conversations with FiFi & TK.

Cheers,

T.K.

4 thoughts on “Don’t go to College: Isaac Morehouse on education, entrepreneurship, and what it takes to succeed in the real world

  1. Very good! Going to check out his site. And his
    favorite book is “Human Action.” Great book!

    When I was young I read a lot of good mystery novels
    and realize that life is about being a detective, on the
    search for and unravelling the mysteries around us.
    Basically I approached life and work this way. Made it
    very enjoyable and rewarding.

    I didn’t plan to become a business owner. It was this
    journey—a process— that Isaac Morehouse is talking
    about—as he defines success—a style of being. Not
    the end result.

    As an income tax business owner now, everything I’d
    learned before informed this. I would treat a business
    I worked for as though it was my own and realize that
    it became invaluable to running my own business.

    I didn’t even think I belonged in business because I’m
    more academically oriented, until I got the spirit of it.

    I have excellent people working with me and they all
    have that entrepreneurial spirit. They are invaluable
    because they use marketing skills to obtain and keep
    clients. I know how to teach them about this. In the
    trenches. They have highly defined life skills. I look for
    these skills. Some of them are with me since I first
    started. (Their ages are 23 – 73. ) The 23 year old has
    been working since he was 13 and I hired him last year
    because he is exceptional. They are all truly blessings.

    And we approach our clients’ taxes like detectives.
    Like college students, tax preparers are a dime-a-
    dozen, until you find those exceptional people. And
    they get it that it isn’t about just doing people’s taxes.
    We build relationships with them. We have thousands
    of clients, we’ve had them for years and they continue
    to refer more to us. It’s quite a dynamic. And it is very
    exciting. And fun.

    Well, I’ve gone on too long but the interview sparked me.
    Especially as Isaac sees businessmen as philosophers.

    Analyze and synchronize.

    Kudos.

    1. Very good! Going to check out his site. And his
      favorite book is “Human Action.” Great book!

      Glad you enjoyed it! He’s made a believer out of me. I have now joined the Praxis team. More on that later. Human Action is one that I will be checking out soon. I’m actually working my way through a pretty rigorous self-study course on Econ right now. More on that later too.

      When I was young I read a lot of good mystery novels
      and realize that life is about being a detective, on the
      search for and unravelling the mysteries around us.
      Basically I approached life and work this way. Made it
      very enjoyable and rewarding.

      I like your approach. This is exactly how I approach the practice and study of philosophy.

      I didn’t plan to become a business owner. It was this
      journey—a process— that Isaac Morehouse is talking
      about—as he defines success—a style of being. Not
      the end result.

      As an income tax business owner now, everything I’d
      learned before informed this. I would treat a business
      I worked for as though it was my own and realize that
      it became invaluable to running my own business.

      Hmmm. Let me throw a thought out there for you to consider.

      I will be hosting a podcast for Praxis (this will probably not start for a couple of months). I will be focusing on entrepreneurs, their stories, and the lessons they’ve learned. I want it to be a resource for many of the students who would benefit from hearing the wisdom of entrepreneurs. No pressure, but I’d love for you to consider the possibility of me interviewing you.

      I have excellent people working with me and they all
      have that entrepreneurial spirit. They are invaluable
      because they use marketing skills to obtain and keep
      clients. I know how to teach them about this. In the
      trenches. They have highly defined life skills. I look for
      these skills. Some of them are with me since I first
      started. (Their ages are 23 – 73. ) The 23 year old has
      been working since he was 13 and I hired him last year
      because he is exceptional. They are all truly blessings.

      And we approach our clients’ taxes like detectives.
      Like college students, tax preparers are a dime-a-
      dozen, until you find those exceptional people. And
      they get it that it isn’t about just doing people’s taxes.
      We build relationships with them. We have thousands
      of clients, we’ve had them for years and they continue
      to refer more to us. It’s quite a dynamic. And it is very
      exciting. And fun.

      Your description makes me want to come work for you 🙂

      1. Am still checking out the Praxis site. Also curious and
        appreciate your future podcast offer. Sounds like it
        would be a very worthwhile endeavour. You’re a busy
        man, T.K! TeeKay. Te’Koa. Chuckling at your coffee
        cup. Thank you for your consideration.

        There are 3 books I think of on the topic of business
        and life: From Good to Great (Jim Collins) and In
        Search of Excellence (Peters and Waterman) plus
        Think and Grow Rich (Napoleon Hill).

        Have often recommended to many. Have given as
        gifts to a few. Even some young ones starting out.
        On my (ever growing) long list of reading suggested
        by my son is Rich is a State of Mind by Gignac and
        Townshend.

        Would like to challenge “This video will CHANGE
        your life” by Alan Watts. Despite its good music and
        appealing look, I think it’s way off base . And actually
        creates frustration. This makes me “itch.”

        Don’t agree with its basic premise asked “What would
        you do if money were no object?” Or the notion that
        answers lie in painting, poetry, writing, out-of-doors
        life, parasailing, rock climbing, etc. Suspect that the
        answers were what people THOUGHT they would like
        to do—not what they REALLY want to do. That their
        life isn’t fulfilled otherwise. Or what others thought
        on their behalf. (Rather than sidelines they could
        perform in conjunction with work, IF so desired. )

        Apart from sounding like a modern hippy approach.

        The oft pictured/worded sentiment that office work
        is a drudge. Crass. As though there’s nothing spiritual
        in this. Sounds so much like the old tired adage I’ve
        heard over the years that if it weren’t for money $$$
        life would be just great for human beings.

        There is actually a segment of society in Canada, the
        U.S. and elsewhere that receives welfare money, now
        going into the 3rd generation. It saps their drive,
        motivation and initiative. These governments are
        appealing to the weakest in human nature and last
        figures show that we are now tipping over into 50%
        single parent homes. At the behest of trying to
        reduce poverty, they’ve created more poverty and
        “money is no object” here.

        Human beings aren’t meant to be idle.

        The earning of money is a profound sacred process.
        It can give us self-respect, independence, purpose…

        To be continued….

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